Kia ora tātau it is Matariki time, happy new year!

What is Matariki

Matariki, also known as Mata – Ariki (eyes of God) or Pleiades, is a time to celebrate new life, to remember those who’ve passed and to plan for the future. It’s a time to spend with whānau and friends – to enjoy kai (food), waiata (song), tākaro (games) and haka (dance). There are millions of stars within the constellation and nine visible stars, which include 

Matariki, Tupuārangi, Waipuna-ā-Rangi, Waitī, Tupuānuku, Ururangi, Waitā, Pōhutukawa and Hiwa-i-te-Rangi. Each star holds a certain significance over our wellbeing and environment, as seen from the Māori view of the world.

For SOUNZ, our acknowledgement of Matariki is very important as not only does it signify a new year within the Māori and Pacific calendar, but it is also a time to be entertained with great music.

Please find further information about Matariki songs, live events and more information on the stars here.

Matariki playlists

Matariki songs on Spotify

Matariki songs on YouTube

Matariki Spotify playlist

Matariki events

 

Matariki stars

Matariki is the star that signifies reflection, hope, our connection to the environment and the gathering of people. Matariki is also connected to the health and wellbeing of people.

 

Pōhutukawa is the star connected to those that have passed on.

 

Waitī is connected with all freshwater bodies and the food sources that are sustained by those waters.

 

Waitā is associated with the ocean and food sources within it.

 

Waipuna-ā-rangi is connected with the rain.

 

Tupuānuku is the star connected with everything that grows within the soil to be harvested or gathered for food.

 

Tupuarangi is connected to food that comes from the sky and is the star that connects the cluster to the harvesting of birds and other elevated food products like fruit and berries from the trees.

 

Ururangi is the star connected with the winds.

 

Hiwaiterangi is the star connected with granting our wishes and realising our aspirations for the coming year.


Credit: Te Wānanga o Aotearoa

 

SOUNZ blog is designed for expressive discussion and debate amongst the arts and broader community. This is intended to be a safe space so please remember to keep comments respectful and avoid personal attacks, criticisms of specific organisations and defamatory language. Comments are moderated to ensure that they comply with SOUNZ’s Community guidelines.